Housetraining/Home Essentials

 

 

Home Essentials: You need to Puppy-Proof your house inside and out keep potentially dangerous items in off-limit areas before bringing your puppy home for the first time, as well as make sure that you have all the things he/she requires to be comfortable, such as bedding, toys ect...

Before you get your puppy you will need to have the following

  • Premium Puppy food, such as Taste of the wild Dog food, and healthy treats.
  • Stainless-steel, non-tipping food and water bowls.
  • I.D. tags with the contact information for yourself and your veterinarian.
  • A collar and 6-foot leather or nylon leash.
  • An airline-approved home and travel crate (large enough to transport him as he grows).
  • Puppy shampoo.
  • Brushes and combs.
  • Cleanup supplies such as stain remover, Bounty paper towels, swiffer floor dusters and a deodorizing spray.
  • Puppies should be fed at the same time every day. Feeding at the same time will keep your dog on a bathroom schelude.

The first thing you should always do before your puppy comes home is to lie on the ground and look around. You want to be able to see everything your puppy is going to see. For the puppy, the world is one big chew toy. Puppies need toys to chew on to relieve teething pain and pressure, as well as just for fun! Playing with toys from puppyhood encourages good behavior and social skills throughout your dog's life. A happy, playful dog is a content and well-adjusted one. Also, because all puppies chew to soothe their gums and help loosen puppy teeth, dogs should always have easy access to several different toys. Your home is now his home, too: and before you even bring yournew puppy in to his new forever home, be smart owner and make your home accessible for him. In fact, In order for him to grow into a stable, well-adjusted dog, he has to feel comfortable in his surrounding. Remember, he is leaving the warmth and security of his mother and littermates, as well as the familiarity of the only place he has ever known, so it is important to make his transition to your home - his new home- as easy as possible.

House Training: This is usually the first question a new puppy owner has. They often have no idea how to go about this fact of life. Your puppy will most certainly have to go to the bathroom sooner or later. Your first job is getting your puppy to do the DO where you want him to. Using a crate will expedite the process. dogs dislike soiling where they sleep and eat. this fact makes a crate a useful tool for housetraining.


Planning your method of training is the most important thing you can do.

Crating the puppy. Most dog owners and expert authorities such as dog traininers and veterinarians recommend dog crates as the BEST way to train and raise a puppy. The purpose of a dog crate is to provide confinement for reasons of security, safety, housebreaking, protection of household goods, illness/injury, or just plain general control. To the dog the crate is seem, NOT as a "cruel jail," but as a den that the dog seeks for security and safety. ALL DOGS like to have their own special spot within the home. They are actually much happier and more secure having their lives controlled and structured by humans, and would far father be prevented from causing trouble than to be punished for it later. A young puppy 8-10 weeks old, usually has no problem accepting its crate as its "own special place". Be consistent and PATIENT. Establish a "crate routine" immediately and stick to it as closely as possible. A puppy should be taken outdoors to a specific bathroom spot after every meal, nap and at regular intervals in between. A good rule is to keep the puppy in the crate during any period when the puppy isn't being directly supervised by a responsible person.

How much is too much? The use of the kennel provides an easy means of housebreaking: total peace of mind when leaving the dog home alone: safety and convenience while traveling or in an unfamiliar location: and ahandy time-out place when the household becomes hectic or the dog is misbehaving or underfoot. However,the dog crate was NEVER intended for all-day everyday confinement. A dog should be exercised vigorously before and after crating, and given plenty of "quality' time when the family is there. Ideally, someone should come in at midday to spend some time with the dog, and let it out for exercise. A radio or TV should be left on to provide some companionship when the dog is left alone for long periods of time. A bored, lonely dog is NOT A HAPPY DOG. All Siberian need exercise to keep them physically and mentally healthy.

Potty Time: Before you start we suggest that you identify the place where you want your puppy to visit when the need occurs. This is very important as weather conditions change throughout the year. Rain, snow, ice, hot and cold weather will have an impact on your ability to supervise your puppy and even perhaps alter your willingness to follow through in your supervision of the activity.

Since everyone lives in different types of housing and climates, one answer as to the location is impossible for us to determine. The location you select should be accessible both day and night in all weather conditions and afford security for your puppy's safety as well as for yourself.

Designated place for your puppy to go.

There are basically 3 types of house training destinations:

  • Pee pads
  • Potty box similar to a cat little box.
  • Outside locations.

Regardless of the destination, once you establish the location always take him/her to the same location when it is potty time, otherwise he will think it is play time. Make sure there recognizable is a difference.

The rules of nature will help you once you have been successful in having your puppy potty in the desired location. Initially do not clean up the potty leave it in the "Potty Zone" this will insure he will have the scent in the "Potty Zone" the next time he has to go, dogs look for the smell of previous occasions, once they determine that this is "the place", they will use it.